This site uses javascript to implement some of its functionality. Please enable javascript in your web browser to ensure full functionality is available.

UMFK Professor's Poem published in Hurricane Relief Anthology, "Southern Revival"

May 5, 2006

NR06044

University of Maine at Fort Kent professor of English, Geraldine Cannon Becker, recently had her poem, "Kudzu and a Question under Moon Shine" published in the anthology, Southern Revival: Deep Magic for Hurricane Relief.

The compilation features the works of a select group of writers and artists whose goal is to help restore hurricane-ravaged libraries in the south and to put books back into the hands of evacuees. The publication was released April 29.

Cannon Becker, who publishes under her maiden name, had her poem reformatted into a prose poem to fit the anthology, and to allow room for an author's note. Cannon Becker thinks the narrative poem still works well in its new format.

"Formatting issues can often be a problem," Cannon Becker notes. "We just put up our first issue of The Aroostook Review on May 1, 2006, and I have already had a few poets contact me requesting punctuation corrections, line break and spacing corrections. I expected to have a few kinks to work out with our first issue, and luckily most of the people who sent us work have been very understanding. Most people are happy to see their work up, but with poetry the spacing is often critical." Cannon Becker, who is a poet, understands that aspect of poetry very well.

The 40-page anthology, Southern Revival offers diverse poetry and prose which honors and celebrates the cultural magic of the Gulf Coast. The eclectic mix features works which include the creation myth of the Mississippi River; the story of a shape-changing gator woman; a poem discussing revival "works" in a jungle of kudzu; a tale of a flood in New Orleans which "reunites" several generations of women; and other works that can only be described as a jambalaya of southern voices, vision and invention.

Copies of the publication will sell for a minimum donation of $10, but the organization expects that many people will donate $20 or $25. For every $1 donated to First Book, two new books will be distributed by the charity to a library, or to a needy hurricane evacuee. Copies may be reserved on-line at magicalrealismmaven@yahoo.com. For purchase information, visit: www.angelfire.com/wa2/margin/SouthernRevival.html.

Southern Revival: Deep Magic for Hurricane Relief is a small press effort by publisher Tamara Kaye Sellman of Bainbridge Island, Washington. One hundred percent of donations and sales of the anthology publication will benefit First Book, a national non-profit organization dedicated to give children from low-income families the opportunity to read and own new, first books. Information about the organization is available on-line at www.firstbook.org

The current issue of The Aroostook Review may be accessed online at: http://aroostookreview.umfk.maine.edu/

For those interested in contributing to the next issue, theme will be "The Healing Power of Art: Bringing Creativity from the Chaos." Cannon Becker hopes to connect the theme with a story-telling symposium being planned by SAGES (the Student Association for Greater English Studies), herself, and other colleagues at UMFK. Presentations from the symposium may be published.

For more information on any of the publications, contact Geraldine Cannon Becker at 834-7695.